December Mental Health News Round Up

December Mental Health News Round Up

Our round up of December's key mental health news stories, affecting children and young people.

Government lay out plans for CAMHS

On Monday 4th December the Government published a Green Paper laying out their plans for Children and Adolescent Mental Health Services. The proposals include introducing mental health support teams (linked to groups of schools and colleges), designated leads for mental health in all schools, new guidance for schools that will address the effect of trauma and a four-week waiting time across CAMHS.

Sarah Brennan, our Chief Executive, says:

In terms of the need that is out there and the lack of services, and the number of years these services have been underfunded, it will still take quite a long time to actually have a direct impact on the frontline.
Sarah Brennan, Chief Executive

Quote taken from an interview on Channel 4 News

Further media coverage by:

To hear what we think about the Green Paper, read our blog post:

Facebook acknowledges social media can harm mental health

In a statement written by their Director of Research, David Ginsberg and Research Scientist Moira Burke, Facebook have acknowledged that, "in general, when people spend a lot of time passively consuming information – reading but not interacting with people – they report feeling worse afterwards.” Separate studies of research from The University of Michigan, Yale and California San Diego have shown that an intense use of social media can be linked to depression, low self-esteem and feelings of isolation in young people.

In response to this research, Facebook suggest that users engage more on the site, sharing messages and posting comments to improve wellbeing. However, mental health campaigners have urged internet companies to go further.

Sarah Brennan, our Chief Executive, says:

Young people tell us they want social media companies to do more to tackle online bullying and promote good mental health.
Sarah Brennan, Chief Executive

NHS survey shows over a quarter of women struggling with mental health

A survey by NHS Digital has shown an increase in mental illness across England, with 28% of women aged 16-24 struggling with their mental health. Participants were asked about their general levels of happiness, depression, anxiety, sleep disturbance and self-confidence. The research shows that in both young men and women, the percentage of people struggling with their mental health has risen since 2012.

Tom Madders, our Director of Communications & Campaigns, says:

"We are facing a mental health crisis for children and young people. Teens face pressures including stress at school, bullying, body issues and the added burden of the 24/7 online world. Girls may also be affected by early sexualisation, and the feeling that their life needs to be as flawless as pictures in news feeds."

It takes a lot of courage for a young person to reach out for help, but often it’s not available. That’s why there needs to be sufficient funding as well as a focus on wellbeing in schools.
Tom Madders, Director of Communications & Campaigns

Media coverage by:

Teenagers’ mental health over Christmas affected by social media

A survey by The Children’s Society shows how teenagers will compare their Christmas to that of their friends on social media, raising concerns for the impact this can have on their mental health. 31% said that using social media at Christmas makes them want more gifts and presents after seeing what their friends received. 

Sarah Brennan, our Chief Executive, says:

What young people see on social media often doesn’t reflect real life, and while the online world can have a positive impact on young people, we also need to do more to help young people build resilience to the pressures of being online and know when to take a break if it’s too much.
Sarah Brennan, Chief Executive

Media coverage by:

Back To Top